Tag: housing

NYC Neighborhood Guide: Where Tourist Must Visit

 

Planning a trip to New York City? Below you will find a handful of the top attractions, places to see, and which neighborhoods in New York to visit during your vacation.

 

Downtown

Financial District (Wall Street)

 

The financial district or better known as Wall Street encompasses the entire southern tip of Manhattan and is considered the economic capital of the country.

 

Things to do in the Financial District

 

You should take a trip to Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan for a stroll through flower gardens and waterfront landscape. Catch a ferry to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island to learn about immigration to the United States through NYC.

 

Explore the moving 9/11 Memorial & Museum, located on the former site of the World Trade Center. Here you’ll find a monument to the lives lost in 1993 and 2001 and learn about the brave history of those who lived through the tragedy and helped to rebuild this iconic part of NYC.

 

See what all the excitement is about at the headquarters of the New York Stock exchange. Stop by the impressive federal Hall building and be sure not to miss 40 Wall Street.

 

Little Italy & Chinatown

 

Little Italy and Chinatown are two distinct neighborhoods that represent two different cultures with an emphasis on one common thing. That thing being delicious, ethnic food.

 

Things to do in Chinatown

 

Be sure to stop by Mott and Grand Streets for exotic food stands busy markets and little shops. If you want a little cultural perspective and for a better understanding of Chinatown, the world’s largest Chinatown outside of Asia, visit the Museum of Chinese in America.

Things to do in Little Italy

 

Check out the boutique shopping scene in NoLlta (North of Little Italy). Then head to grab some delicious Italian cultured food at any of the popular restaurants along Mulberry Street. Then poke around the specialty shops to see all the imported Italian treats.

 

After you’ve shopped and tasted your way through the North of Little Italy, head to the Italian American Museum for a cultural account of Italian immigration to the United States.

2019 NYC Housing Predictions: What to Expect Next Year

The bumpy sales market that took place in 2018 has been a turbulent time for New York City real estate. Luxury prices have continued to sink, and transportation headaches have played a big role in driving market dynamics. Given that the housing market looks different than it did a year ago, here are six broader trends we see dominating 2019.

 

The Buyers Market is Staying

 

The number of homes listed for sale hit all-time highs during 2018, yet recorded sales throughout the city fell. More New Yorkers – seeking to accommodate a growing family, to relocate, or simply to cash out their investment – will inevitably look to sell in 2019, adding to a market that’s already saturated. These sellers will need to take much greater measures to move their homes.

 

Queens is the exception

 

The big outlier in the sales market in 2018 was Queens. Prices there have risen at a consistently faster pace than in Brooklyn or Manhatten, yet remain relatively affordable, with an average listing price of $657,000, compared to Manhatten’s $1.39 million and Brooklyn’s $950,000. Much of the enduring price growth in the borough is attributable to making up for lost time.

 

Downtown is the New Downtown

 

With interest rates and sales prices high, renting will remain more attractive than buying for many New Yorkers in 2019. We expect competition for rental units in many of the city’s priciest, most central neighborhoods to heat up next summer. Rents in newly chic neighborhoods in outer-boroughs now equal in many Manhattan neighborhoods. This past fall, median rents for 1-bedroom apartments in Dumbo, Downtown Brooklyn, and Long Island City exceeded those in Chelsea, Nolita, and the East Village, respectively. Outer-borough new construction may still offer more per dollar in terms of space and amenities, but with roughly similar median prices in many outer-borough and Manhattan neighborhoods, choosing among them has become a matter of preference than affordability.

 

Bedlam on Bedford Avenue

The popular commuting line, the L train, will shut down for 18 months beginning April 27. The market for nearby rentals has been weakening over the course of 2018, as longtime residents decamp for more convenient neighborhoods. Nonetheless, people still have a lot of interest in the neighborhood.

The Best Cheap Neighborhoods in NYC

For a certain rarified class home buyer, money is no object. For the rest of us, it’s nice to find a deal. However just because something is affordable, doesn’t mean it should be unappealing.

The following NYC Neighborhoods are calculated based on a cost-per-room metric, presuming that most homes are shared among families and roommates, the ease of their commutes, crime rates, noise complaints, green spaces, and bike friendliness.

From established enclaves like Forest Hills to up-and-coming areas like the Bronx’s Concourse neighborhood, these are places that balance both cost and quality of life.

Windsor Terrace

Tucked away at the southwestern end of Prospect Park, this tranquil spot feels more like a sleepy Hudson River village than the middle of Brooklyn. That small-town vibe can mean fewer shopping and nightlife options than other areas though. Prices remain relatively low compared to prime Brooklyn hoods.

Forest Hills

This leafy Queens spot is quiet, but not too quiet. The tree-lined neighborhood is more bucolic than most NYC hoods. There are also great shopping options such as Sephora, clothing stores, good ramen, and Chinese food, and good bars.

Roosevelt Island

A renovated Manhatten co-op for a mere $800 per square foot? Welcome to Roosevelt Island. This strip of land in the middle of the East River is technically part of Manhatten, making it one of the borough’s more affordable nabes. Data visualization designer Silvio DaSilva moved to the island from Chelsea at the end of 2016. She was immediately drawn by lower prices and what she says is a relaxed, almost suburban lifestyle.

The river views are good too. Linked to the city by the F train and the tram, the area draws steady interest from Queens residents and, occasionally, from mainland Manhattanites. That’s probably due to the spot’s unique vibe.

Bay Ridge

Rounding out the southwest corner of Brooklyn, Bay Ridge isn’t the most accessible of neighborhoods, but between its scenic harbor views, solid shopping, and dining scenes, and affordable prices, why would you want to leave anyway?

The neighborhood contains some of the city’s best Greek, Italian and Middle Eastern food. It also has a quiet, green, and authentic New York feel.

Clinton Hill

With an average price per square foot of $1,013, Clinton Hill doesn’t seem that affordable on the face of it. But with average prices per square foot in spots like neighboring Prospect Heights approaching the $1,300 mark, the area counts as something of a bargain.

It’s also one of the greenest neighborhoods in Brooklyn, with leafy streets and charming brownstones.


 

Top NYC Neighborhoods to Live in

New York City is one of the most expensive costs of living in the country, making it the ultimate challenge to find a place to live.

 

Many factors depend on where you want to live and where you can afford to live. Neighborhoods vary from their peak cost and downfalls when it comes to price, commute distance, transportation access, nightlife, and other lifestyle amenities.

 

A company that compiles information on cities called Niche, recently released its annual ranking of the best neighborhoods in New York City.

 

These neighborhoods range from historic to hip and pose their own identities and can offer residents a sense of home in a city of over 8 million people.

 

Below are the best New York City neighborhoods to live in:

 

Hell’s Kitchen

 

Hell’s Kitchen is also known as Midtown West, was once a poor and working-class neighborhood that has steadily gentrified over a couple of decades. This neighborhood is within close proximity to many Broadway theaters and the famed Actors Studio. The neighborhood then became a popular area for aspiring actors. Hell’s Kitchen has a shorter commute time and offers a lively nightlife scene for its residents.

 

Flatiron District  

 

This is home of the Flatiron Building, one of the older skyscrapers in the city, at the intersection of Broadway and Fifth Avenue. The Flatiron District features a great restaurant scene, upscale real estate, and an impressive stretch of shopping. It is also becoming known as a huge area for fitness clubs.

 

Greenwich Village

 

Greenwich Village possesses its own sense of character and charm within the city. The neighborhood has served as a home to the creative community, the LGBT movement, and New York University. The area is now a melting pot of its own, filled with bustling restaurants and venues while keeping its small community feel.

 

Brooklyn Heights

 

Brooklyn Heights is located just off the Brooklyn Bridge along the East River and has a historic feel within close proximity of Manhattan. The neighborhood contains more than 600 pre-Civil War houses and has become a popular neighborhood for families. The area has been called New York’s First Suburb.

Affordable NYC Housing – Summer 2018

Affordable housing in the wonderful city of New York isn’t the easiest to find, but have no fear, there is a light at the end of this tunnel. Recently, New York’s Curbed posted an article on some of the most affordable locations within our metropolitan. Spots are filling up quickly though so apply right away!

Manhattan West
This megabuilding is a 62-story tower located in the western part of Manhattan. There are a few floor plans to choose from including one-bedrooms, two-bedrooms, and just a couple of three-bedrooms. Rent can range from $600+/month to $2,500+/month. They have an application deadline of July 10 so act quickly.

222 East 4th St
Located only a few blocks from Grand Central is a 42-story rental. The deadline to apply for this location is July 2. It’s finishing up its development by BLDG Management with the design of Handel Architects. At its completion, it will be home to 300+ units. Rent is estimated to be between $600+/month and $2,700+/month for a mix of studios, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom units.

Tremont Renaissance
This 12-story development is located at 4215 Park Ave in the Bronx Tremont neighborhood. The units throughout this building have a rent between $800+/month and $1,900+/month. Great for singles and also families.

Hunters Landing
59 affordable units are offered at Hunters Landing, just a few blocks from the train stop on Hunters Point Avenue. These units, ranging from a studio to a three-bedroom, are offered exclusively to middle-income New Yorkers.

1 Flatbush Ave
The Brooklyn rental, located on Flatbush Ave and Fulton St, is a 19-story building that has just opened a lottery for their 37 available units. Although a majority of the rentals are studios, there are a few one- and two-bedroom units as well. Rent rates are from $900+/month and $1,100+/month.

The Maya
Possibly one of the best apartment complexes in New York City is the Maya, located in the Jamaica region of Queens. Each of the units, including all from studio to three-bedroom, feature an outdoor space, indoor/outdoor parking, a fitness center, and a rooftop terrace. Rents are in the range of $1,400+/month and $2,200+/month.

How Are Millennials Affecting the Housing Market?

Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 11.36.31 PMThat the odds stacked against Millennials isn’t necessarily secret. Those who are between the ages of eighteen and thirty-three have several factors set against them in the search for financial stability. Many struggle under crushing student loan debt; others can’t find a well-paying job to even begin paying off said loan debt. Between these and any number of other contributing factors, Millennials struggle to enter the housing market. As a result, several authorities in the real estate market were recently asked whether they thought Millennials were dragging down the housing market; their responses were collected for an article recently completed by U-T San Diego.

Nearly all those asked noted that several factors that are beyond the control of Millennials play a role in their difficulties to join the housing market and become homeowners. Several factors include difficulty paying off their very expensive college degree—specifically in finding an actual job that is capable of paying off student debt—tight lending standards, high housing prices, a delay in marrying and/or starting a family and hesitancy due to seeing friends and family suffer through debt of their own. As a result of all of these factors, Millennials are forced to live at home with parents for an extended period of time—longer than any other previous generation. Alternatively, even those who are able to find a job to help pay off their various debts, the job does not often pay enough to afford to become a homeowner in the slowly recovering economy; many are forced to settle as renters.

However, despite all of the struggles that exist against Millennials, many of the authorities asked believe that the desire to become homeowners is strong. Leslie Kilpatrick, president of the Greater San Diego Association of Realtors, cited a study recently conducted by the California Association of Realtors found that the majority of Millennials plan to buy a home in the next five years. Although all those asked agree that an economic turn around is needed for this statistic to become a reality, some are seeing the signs of the start of a turn around. Home prices have stabilized and interest rates remain at historic lows. Credit availability and lending guidelines have improved and finally fewer investors are in competition with first-time buyers. All of these factors combined may indicate a positive future for Millennials entering the housing market. All authorities asked on the issue believe that the group holds enough in number and in power to have a strong influence on the housing market, should they decide to pursue owning a home instead of renting.