NYC Neighborhood Guide: Where Tourist Must Visit

 

Planning a trip to New York City? Below you will find a handful of the top attractions, places to see, and which neighborhoods in New York to visit during your vacation.

 

Downtown

Financial District (Wall Street)

 

The financial district or better known as Wall Street encompasses the entire southern tip of Manhattan and is considered the economic capital of the country.

 

Things to do in the Financial District

 

You should take a trip to Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan for a stroll through flower gardens and waterfront landscape. Catch a ferry to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island to learn about immigration to the United States through NYC.

 

Explore the moving 9/11 Memorial & Museum, located on the former site of the World Trade Center. Here you’ll find a monument to the lives lost in 1993 and 2001 and learn about the brave history of those who lived through the tragedy and helped to rebuild this iconic part of NYC.

 

See what all the excitement is about at the headquarters of the New York Stock exchange. Stop by the impressive federal Hall building and be sure not to miss 40 Wall Street.

 

Little Italy & Chinatown

 

Little Italy and Chinatown are two distinct neighborhoods that represent two different cultures with an emphasis on one common thing. That thing being delicious, ethnic food.

 

Things to do in Chinatown

 

Be sure to stop by Mott and Grand Streets for exotic food stands busy markets and little shops. If you want a little cultural perspective and for a better understanding of Chinatown, the world’s largest Chinatown outside of Asia, visit the Museum of Chinese in America.

Things to do in Little Italy

 

Check out the boutique shopping scene in NoLlta (North of Little Italy). Then head to grab some delicious Italian cultured food at any of the popular restaurants along Mulberry Street. Then poke around the specialty shops to see all the imported Italian treats.

 

After you’ve shopped and tasted your way through the North of Little Italy, head to the Italian American Museum for a cultural account of Italian immigration to the United States.

2019 NYC Housing Predictions: What to Expect Next Year

The bumpy sales market that took place in 2018 has been a turbulent time for New York City real estate. Luxury prices have continued to sink, and transportation headaches have played a big role in driving market dynamics. Given that the housing market looks different than it did a year ago, here are six broader trends we see dominating 2019.

 

The Buyers Market is Staying

 

The number of homes listed for sale hit all-time highs during 2018, yet recorded sales throughout the city fell. More New Yorkers – seeking to accommodate a growing family, to relocate, or simply to cash out their investment – will inevitably look to sell in 2019, adding to a market that’s already saturated. These sellers will need to take much greater measures to move their homes.

 

Queens is the exception

 

The big outlier in the sales market in 2018 was Queens. Prices there have risen at a consistently faster pace than in Brooklyn or Manhatten, yet remain relatively affordable, with an average listing price of $657,000, compared to Manhatten’s $1.39 million and Brooklyn’s $950,000. Much of the enduring price growth in the borough is attributable to making up for lost time.

 

Downtown is the New Downtown

 

With interest rates and sales prices high, renting will remain more attractive than buying for many New Yorkers in 2019. We expect competition for rental units in many of the city’s priciest, most central neighborhoods to heat up next summer. Rents in newly chic neighborhoods in outer-boroughs now equal in many Manhattan neighborhoods. This past fall, median rents for 1-bedroom apartments in Dumbo, Downtown Brooklyn, and Long Island City exceeded those in Chelsea, Nolita, and the East Village, respectively. Outer-borough new construction may still offer more per dollar in terms of space and amenities, but with roughly similar median prices in many outer-borough and Manhattan neighborhoods, choosing among them has become a matter of preference than affordability.

 

Bedlam on Bedford Avenue

The popular commuting line, the L train, will shut down for 18 months beginning April 27. The market for nearby rentals has been weakening over the course of 2018, as longtime residents decamp for more convenient neighborhoods. Nonetheless, people still have a lot of interest in the neighborhood.

Top 5 Neighborhoods to Raise a Family in NYC

New York City is one of the best locations for raising a family. NYC is diverse, exciting, and full of unique activities for both you and your kids.The city is composed of a wide selection of neighborhoods, including the family-friendly options listed below.

Astoria, Queens

Astoria is one of many great options! The neighborhood offers some of the best schools in the city that are both progressive and affordable. You’ll have access to a wide variety of public parks and playgrounds, as well as a great library system. One of the other great perks of living in Astoria is the Astoria Park, which includes a public pool.

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

Bay Ridge is a historical neighborhood that’s a cornerstone of Brooklyn. The area is family friendly, and inclusive of people of all ages and cultures. Renting or purchasing property in Bay Ridge is almost half the cost of renting or buying property in the rest of the borough. The neighborhood also includes great schools, and plenty of parks so your children can play in green spaces.

Harlem

One of the best advantages of living in Harlem is larger apartment options for inexpensive prices. Not only does the area offer an easy downtown commute for parents, but it offers plenty of activities for children. The nearby Riverbank State Park hosts classes in art, music, sports, and dance. The  Apollo Theater and the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling are two other great kid-friendly entertainment options.

Upper West Side, Manhattan

The Upper West Side is home to some of the best schools in the city, and is conveniently located near Central Park so your children will have plenty of room to roam! They’ll also have access to some of the best museums in the world, such as the American Museum of Natural History. The Riverside Park is another attraction that includes playgrounds and historical monuments.

Battery Park City

Located near the financial district, Battery Park City is a sleek yet bustling community and the location of two of NYC’s best schools, PS 276 and Stuyvesant High School. The Battery Park Esplanade, a beautiful road along the river, is a great place to take your kids for a walk or bike ride. There are also a variety of parks, many of which are also dog-friendly, and baseball fields.

Any of these neighborhoods is a great option for you and your family. New York City is one of the most unique and famous cities in the world. Your children will be lucky to grow up there!

The Best Cheap Neighborhoods in NYC

For a certain rarified class home buyer, money is no object. For the rest of us, it’s nice to find a deal. However just because something is affordable, doesn’t mean it should be unappealing.

The following NYC Neighborhoods are calculated based on a cost-per-room metric, presuming that most homes are shared among families and roommates, the ease of their commutes, crime rates, noise complaints, green spaces, and bike friendliness.

From established enclaves like Forest Hills to up-and-coming areas like the Bronx’s Concourse neighborhood, these are places that balance both cost and quality of life.

Windsor Terrace

Tucked away at the southwestern end of Prospect Park, this tranquil spot feels more like a sleepy Hudson River village than the middle of Brooklyn. That small-town vibe can mean fewer shopping and nightlife options than other areas though. Prices remain relatively low compared to prime Brooklyn hoods.

Forest Hills

This leafy Queens spot is quiet, but not too quiet. The tree-lined neighborhood is more bucolic than most NYC hoods. There are also great shopping options such as Sephora, clothing stores, good ramen, and Chinese food, and good bars.

Roosevelt Island

A renovated Manhatten co-op for a mere $800 per square foot? Welcome to Roosevelt Island. This strip of land in the middle of the East River is technically part of Manhatten, making it one of the borough’s more affordable nabes. Data visualization designer Silvio DaSilva moved to the island from Chelsea at the end of 2016. She was immediately drawn by lower prices and what she says is a relaxed, almost suburban lifestyle.

The river views are good too. Linked to the city by the F train and the tram, the area draws steady interest from Queens residents and, occasionally, from mainland Manhattanites. That’s probably due to the spot’s unique vibe.

Bay Ridge

Rounding out the southwest corner of Brooklyn, Bay Ridge isn’t the most accessible of neighborhoods, but between its scenic harbor views, solid shopping, and dining scenes, and affordable prices, why would you want to leave anyway?

The neighborhood contains some of the city’s best Greek, Italian and Middle Eastern food. It also has a quiet, green, and authentic New York feel.

Clinton Hill

With an average price per square foot of $1,013, Clinton Hill doesn’t seem that affordable on the face of it. But with average prices per square foot in spots like neighboring Prospect Heights approaching the $1,300 mark, the area counts as something of a bargain.

It’s also one of the greenest neighborhoods in Brooklyn, with leafy streets and charming brownstones.


 

Top NYC Neighborhoods to Live in

New York City is one of the most expensive costs of living in the country, making it the ultimate challenge to find a place to live.

 

Many factors depend on where you want to live and where you can afford to live. Neighborhoods vary from their peak cost and downfalls when it comes to price, commute distance, transportation access, nightlife, and other lifestyle amenities.

 

A company that compiles information on cities called Niche, recently released its annual ranking of the best neighborhoods in New York City.

 

These neighborhoods range from historic to hip and pose their own identities and can offer residents a sense of home in a city of over 8 million people.

 

Below are the best New York City neighborhoods to live in:

 

Hell’s Kitchen

 

Hell’s Kitchen is also known as Midtown West, was once a poor and working-class neighborhood that has steadily gentrified over a couple of decades. This neighborhood is within close proximity to many Broadway theaters and the famed Actors Studio. The neighborhood then became a popular area for aspiring actors. Hell’s Kitchen has a shorter commute time and offers a lively nightlife scene for its residents.

 

Flatiron District  

 

This is home of the Flatiron Building, one of the older skyscrapers in the city, at the intersection of Broadway and Fifth Avenue. The Flatiron District features a great restaurant scene, upscale real estate, and an impressive stretch of shopping. It is also becoming known as a huge area for fitness clubs.

 

Greenwich Village

 

Greenwich Village possesses its own sense of character and charm within the city. The neighborhood has served as a home to the creative community, the LGBT movement, and New York University. The area is now a melting pot of its own, filled with bustling restaurants and venues while keeping its small community feel.

 

Brooklyn Heights

 

Brooklyn Heights is located just off the Brooklyn Bridge along the East River and has a historic feel within close proximity of Manhattan. The neighborhood contains more than 600 pre-Civil War houses and has become a popular neighborhood for families. The area has been called New York’s First Suburb.

Top 10 Luxurious Apartments for Rent in NYC

Moving to New York City is an extraordinary opportunity. The possibilities are endless, the neighborhoods are continuously expanding, and the broker fees are almost everywhere. There are even ways to avoid broker fees! Apartment hunting can be a long and draining process. Take a little time to have some fun by looking at some of the most extravagant listings out there. These listings will give you something to strive for. Imagine instead of $2,000/month, think instead  $50,000. Below is a list of the most luxurious apartments for rent in NYC.

 

Soho – 20 Greene St. – $75,000/month

 

This gorgeous two-bedroom mansion lives on the (key-locked) top floor of the building. It is made up of 4,189 glorious square feet. The ceilings stand at a towering 14-feet, dark hickory floors, an oversized fireplace, surround-sound speaker system, central climate control, custom-design casement doors, and windows. The kitchen is freshly renovated with industrially sleek style. Enjoy your very own private outdoor gardens attached to the unit. It gets better (which is hard to believe), there’s also a master suite overlooking a bluestone patio, whose bathroom is finished with stylish black and white marble finishes and deep brass lining. And to top it off, it includes a home office, exercise room, and three other terraces that are on the second floor.

 

Upper East Side – 985 5th Ave. – $25,000/month

 

This apartment complex is 26 stories above Manhattan, each of which holds two residences with breathtaking views of Central Park. Each apartment contains a formal dining room, gourmet granite kitchen, polished hardwood floors, marble bath, and multiple walk-in closets. Here you have access to multiple building terraces, a private entrance to your apartment, and a fitness center.

 

Theater District – 130 W 44th St. – $75,000/month

 

This is a pent-out penthouse and is better known as the Director Suite. Thierry Despont designed the light ochre suede walls, leather-wrapped furniture, and two bedrooms, each containing their own massive granite bathroom. The kitchen is outstanding and fully equipped. It also has an 8+ capacity dining room.

 

NoMad – 121 Madison Ave. – $10,904/month

 

This duplex penthouse apartment provides a stellar view of Manhatten, specifically the Empire State Building. It also includes a glorious wrap-around terrace, and the master bathroom has a marble soaking tub, stall showers, double sinks, and a walk-in closet. The kitchen is freshly redone with premium cabinets and stainless steel appliances.

 

West Village – 165 Charles St. – $60,000/month

 

A fantastic 4 bedrooms, each with its own marble bathroom, walk-in closets, and a wraparound terrace. This is an award-winning duplex and it will surely take your breath away. Between views of the Hudson River, a renovated chef’s kitchen with sleek white cabinetry and a climate-controlled wine cellar, and a beautiful naturally lit frosted staircase, it’s almost impossible to choose which feature is the best. Let’s not forget, the building features a 50-foot indoor lap pool, gym, sauna, movie theater, and resident lounge.

Real Estate Market Forecast for NYC in 2018

 

sweet-ice-cream-photography-732946-unsplashThe city that never sleeps has become an even bigger draw for jobs and talent than ever before (if that’s even possible). Especially with Netflix and Spotify opening up new offices in Manhattan drawing even more people to the big apple. Even Amazon is considering a new headquarters location, will it be New York? Growing supply of high paying jobs is bringing in residents attracted to the higher income opportunities and giving them the potential to outbit NYC’s existing residents. If you are watching the market carefully, there are new exciting plot twists helping shape the real estate forecast for 2018.

 

Lack of Affordable Homes

 

Results published by NYSAR show the US housing data for New York and affordable homes have dropped 1%, sales are down 2.5%, and average prices are up 7% from the previous year. There is no lack of conjecture about a possible US housing crash that would take NYC down with it. Many people find high foreclosure rates in the Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island to be unsettling.

 

 

Evidence of a crash is debatable. New Yorkers, however, will face growing competition for affordable homes. Income averages about $60,000 a year in NYC, making it challenging for many to buy homes averaging $680,000.

 

Highlight on declining luxury homes

 

Out of all of the housing markets in NYC, the high-end Manhattan market is falling the fastest. There is currently a 17-month supply of luxury apartments in Manhattan. This is up 10 months just a year ago and total sales volume fell 12% compared with the fourth quarter of last year. This is the lowest level in six years. Rent in Manhattan dropped 1.0% in November and luxury home sales across the city will hit new lows so it says in the 2018 real estate forecast for NYC.

 

Public transit changes driving new demand

 

The backbone of public transportation is obviously the subway. However, the NYC Ferry service expanded and set its capacity even hire to reach Manhattan’s eastern shore and into the Bronx. The L train is still shut down and expected to reopen in 2019 which will have a huge impact on people’s real estate choices.

New to NYC? Start Your Property Search Here!

New York City real estate can be an intimidating topic to broach in a conversation with non-natives. The thought of hundreds of different neighborhoods combined with safety concerns and price sensitivity is enough to stress even the most relaxed outsider. And yet they flock here in droves, searching for a tiny piece of the city to call their own.

I recently came across a list of the Best Neighborhoods in New York City for Newcomers and thought it ideal for alleviating some of the stress mentioned above. Start your search here if you are looking to begin building your adult life in New York.

Lower East Side (LES)

Apartments on the Lower East Side tend to be slightly more affordable than other parts of Manhattan. Buyer beware, however. A desirable location near restaurants, bars, and Insta-famous boutiques translates to limited availability.

Astoria

If budget plays a significant role in your search for housing, then you may want to consider Astoria. Not only is the real estate reasonably priced (at the moment), but the overall cost of living tends to be a bit more affordable in the area. Astoria is not located in Manhattan, but it is close enough for a quick commute.

Murray Hill

Murray Hill is perfect for newly minted college grads with money to spend. Several large townhouses with gorgeous historical details fill the neighborhood.  The location is ideal, and the nightlife is legendary, but the pricing can be quite high, so I’d consider roommates before choosing to move to this particular neighborhood.

Williamsburg (Brooklyn)

Famous for food and art, Williamsburg has been attracting a creative crowd for some time now. Its constant influx of artists promotes consistent revitalization and some of the best trendy shops around. That being said, it can be quite costly to live there. If you like the idea of this vibrant cultural community but lack the purse strings to live in its vivacious center, try considering property on its outskirts.

Harlem

Interest abounds in this historic New York City neighborhood. Although it is best known for a jazzy awakening in the ‘20s, today Harlem caters to a wide range of culturally diverse individuals. Housing is moderately priced, so the area is best for professionals that are in bed at a regular hour.

5 Fundamentals for Networking in Real Estate

The real estate business would be nothing without networking. To be a successful realtor or developer, you have to a strong, well-connected network. There are many tools you can utilize to build connections with professionals and in your community. These fundamentals for networking will give you ways to build your network and find new connections to grow your real estate business.  

Find a supportive team

A great team can make all the difference when networking and it’s important to not limit your team to colleagues. Expand your network to individuals and local firms. Joining forces with real estate industry vendors, if they are not a direct competitor, can help build your clientele. By taking time to refer clients to them, they will do they same for you. Adding such vendors like contractors, master architects and lenders as your connections will greatly benefit your network. These professional connections will be a great help when developing a new property and heighten your chances for a successful transaction.

Have a professional website or blog

Digital marketing is essential to your real estate business and creates a great opportunity to network. This offers your clients something much better than a basic listing. More often than not, the first place clients go to look for a new home is online. By creating a website or blog for your business, you are offering your clients more visual appeal and gives new life to your listings.When it comes to selling a home, you’re really selling the location and lifestyle. Keep them engaged using new and original content about the neighborhood and community with local imagery instead of bland stock property photos.  

Utilize social media

Becoming familiar with social media is one of the greatest networking tools for the real estate business. It’s a great way to connect with your clients and prospective clients in real-time. Social media offers great opportunities to share your knowledge with the public. By making yourself easily available on multiple social media platforms, you can share good press and promote your properties. Posting your listing on social media will help give you a more appealing and authentic voice for potential clients. Taking the time to interact on social media will help build your network and is one of the best ways to find new connections.

Attend networking events

Attending conferences and industry events lets you engage with other professionals and make connections to build your network. This will give you the opportunity to learn new market information and innovations from your colleagues. Conferences and events allow you to make connections from all over. If you have exclusively worked in one area for most of your career, gaining knowledge from professionals outside of your area can offer new insights and ideas.

Become a presence in your community

If you’re in the real estate business, your business is the community. By getting involved and creating a presence in your community, you will build you network. This will also give you insight to the neighborhoods of your properties and the people who live there. A few ways to do this is local sponsorship, volunteering, radio and media, career days at local schools, and developing partnerships with local businesses. With so many ways to get involved in your community, there are endless opportunities to build your network.

Building your network takes time and patience, but there are many ways to get you started. To be successful in the real estate business, you have to build your presence among your connections and your community. Only then, will your business gain the momentum you’ve been waiting for.

The Price of Being a Millennial in NYC

It’s a well-known fact that the cost of living in New York City is one of the highests in the nation. Over the past decade, the cost of living and rent prices have gone up significantly in the city. Although a costly place to live, NYC offers an abundance of career opportunities and metropolitan advantages–which is most appealing to millennials.

Creating a life for themselves in NYC has millennials spending much more than what they can afford. A recent report by StreetEasy, which survey 1,000 renters in NYC, confirms that millennials are much more likely to live outside of their means when it comes to housing in the city. The housing market in NYC is expensive and according to Grant Long, “…despite facing rising housing costs and budgeting constraints, aspirations of owning a home remain high in the city, particularly among millennials.”

All five boroughs–Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island–reported that housing in the city is more than often unaffordable. According to the stats collected by StreetEasy, each generation approaches the situation differently. The New York Business Journal states, “45% [of millennials] say they chose a more expensive home than they’d planned, compared to 30% of ‘Generation Xers’ — those born from the early 1960s to late 1970s — and 19% of baby boomers.” The majority of the older generation seem to know how to realistically budget their cost of living more effectively than millennials.

Although the housing prices of the city continue to rise, about 34% of millennials are hoping to purchase a home sooner rather than later. According to the report, the majority of renters living in NYC find housing to be very unaffordable. Perhaps owning a home is more appealing since 39% of homeowners find housing more affordable, having more freedom to buy and sell. But even owning a home does not shield residents against the struggle of rising housing prices in the city.

Other stats from StreetEasy report that “New Yorkers pay 1.3 times more for housing than average Americans”. In order to stay in the city and find decent housing, about one third of those surveyed reported spending more than their initial budget. To no surprise, 46% say that housing in the city is unaffordable–which one third say the high cost of living is their biggest reason to move.

Even with the cost of living so high, generation after generation come to New York City, hoping to capture the life and opportunities only the five boroughs can offer–no matter what the price.